Monthly Archives: June 2015

Two Novels and two Biographies

How to be both is the da9780241145210zzling new novel by Ali Smith. This book is the winner of the Goldsmiths Prize 2014. It was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2014. It is the winner Of The 2014 Costa Novel Award, winner of the Saltire Society Literary Book Of The Year Award, and in 2014 was nominated for the Folio Prize 2015. Passionate, compassionate, vitally inventive and scrupulously playful, Ali Smith’s novels are like nothing else. How to be both is a novel all about art’s versatility. Borrowing from painting’s fresco technique to make an original literary double-take, it’s a fast-moving genre-bending conversation between forms, times, truths and fictions. There’s a renaissance artist of the 1460s. There’s the child of a child of the 1960s. Two tales of love and injustice twist into a singular yarn where time gets timeless, structural gets playful, knowing gets mysterious, fictional gets real – and all life’s givens get given a second chance. “Smith can make anything happen, which is why she is one of our most exciting writers today”. (Daily Telegraph).

Missing Person by Patrick Modiano recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature

9781567922813For ten years Guy Roland has lived without a past. His current life and name were given to him by his recently retired boss, Hutte, who welcomed him, a one-time client, into his detective agency. Guy makes full use of Hutte’s files – directories, yearbooks, and papers of all kinds going back half a century – but leads to his former life are few. Could he really be that person in a photograph, a young man remembered by some as a South American attache? Or was he someone else, perhaps the disappeared scion of a prominent local family? He interviews strangers and is tantalized by half-clues until, at last, he grasps a thread that leads him through the maze of his own repressed experience.On one level Missing Person is a detective thriller, a 1950s film noir mix of smoky cafes, illegal passports, and insubstantial figures crossing bridges in the fog. On another level, it is also a haunting meditation on the nature of the self.

Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges & H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald


Alan Turing was the mathematician whose cipher-cracking transformed the Second World War. Taken on by British Intelligence in 1938, as a shy young Cambridge don, he combined brilliant logic with a flair for engineering. In 1940 his machines were breaking the Enigma-enciphered messages of Nazi Germany’s air force. He then headed the penetration of the super-secure U-boat communications. But his vision went far beyond this achievement. Before the war he had invented the concept of the universal machine, and in 1945 he turned this into the first design for a digital computer. Turing’s far-sightd plans for the digital era forged ahead into a vision for Artificial Intelligence. However, in 1952 his homosexuality rendered him ea criminal and he was subjected to humiliating treatment. In 1954, aged 41, Alan Turing took his own life.

9780224097000Destined to be a classic of nature writing, H is for Hawk is a record of a spiritual journey – an unflinchingly honest account of Macdonald’s struggle with grief during the difficult process of the hawk’s taming and her own untaming. At the same time, it’s a kaleidoscopic biography of the brilliant and troubled novelist T. H. White, best known for The Once and Future King. It’s a book about memory, nature and nation, and how it might be possible to try to reconcile death with life and love.This book was the winner of the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize. It was the winner of the 2014 Costa Book of the Year Award. It was shortlisted for the 2014 Duff Cooper Prize. It was Shortlisted for the 2014 Thwaites Wainwright Prize.

Categories: Uncategorized

Children Books

There are six new amazing adventures by Geronimo Stilton and a whole bunch of Magic Tree House books for the young readers

.9780545307710 9780307930453

Categories: Uncategorized

New in the book club: two science fiction and two crime novels

Ancillary Justice and its sequel, Ancillary Sword, have both won the Hugo, Nebula, British Science Fiction, Locus and Arthur C. Clarke awards. The author Ann Leckie has worked as a waitress, a receptionist, a rodman on a land-surveying crew, and a recording engineer before publishing her debut novel Ancillary Justice.

9781410475862 9780316246651

You should never talk to strangers…. or take the same train every day!

The Kind Worth Killing by Peter Swanson is this year’s must-read psychological thriller;  The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins “Gripping, enthralling – a top-notch thriller and a compulsive read”. (S J Watson, bestselling author of Before I Go To Sleep)

9780571302192 9780857522320

Categories: Uncategorized

Nuovi arrivi di libri italiani in Biblioteca: scienze, narrativa, il vincitore del Premio Pullitzer 2015, due libri di fumetti e tanti altri ancora (ma nessun libro di cucina, perche’ d’ estate si legge molto e si cucina poco!)

Dettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodotto  Dettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodottoDettagli prodotto

Categories: Uncategorized

New books for an interesting summer


Forever after, there were for them only two sorts of men: the men who were on the Line, and the rest of humanity, who were not. In the despair of a Japanese POW camp on the Burma Death Railway, surgeon Dorrigo Evans is haunted by his love affair with his uncle’s young wife two years earlier. Struggling to save the men under his command from starvation, from cholera, from beatings, he receives a letter that will change his life forever. Hailed as a masterpiece, Richard Flanagan’s epic novel tells the unforgettable story of one man’s reckoning with the truth.



From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant “New York Times” bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II. Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel. In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge. Doerr’s “stunning sense of physical detail and gorgeous metaphors” (“San Francisco Chronicle”) are dazzling. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, he illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another. Ten years in the writing, a National Book Award finalist, “All the Light We Cannot See” is a magnificent, deeply moving novel from a writer “whose sentences never fail to thrill” (“Los Angeles Times”).


AMITAV GHOSH – FLOOD OF FIRE The thrilling climax to the Ibis trilogy that began with the phenomenal Booker-shortlisted Sea of Poppies. It is 1839 and tension has been rapidly mounting between China and British India following the crackdown on opium smuggling by Beijing. With no resolution in sight, the colonial government declares war. One of the vessels requisitioned for the attack, the Hind, travels eastwards from Bengal to China, sailing into the midst of the First Opium War. The turbulent voyage brings together a diverse group of travellers, each with their own agenda to pursue. Among them is Kesri Singh, a sepoy in the East India Company who leads a company of Indian sepoys; Zachary Reid, an impoverished young sailor searching for his lost love, and Shireen Modi, a determined widow en route to China to reclaim her opium-trader husband’s wealth and reputation. Flood of Fire follows a varied cast of characters from India to China, through the outbreak of the First Opium War and China’s devastating defeat, to Britain’s seizure of Hong Kong. Flood of Fire is a thrillingly realised and richly populated novel, imbued with a wealth of historical detail, suffused with the magic of place and plotted with verve. It is a beautiful novel in its own right, and a compelling conclusion to an epic and sweeping story – it is nothing short of a masterpiece.

THE STRANGER Through the story of an ordinary man unwittingly drawn into a senseless murder on an Algerian beach, Camus explored what he termed “the nakedness of man faced with the absurd.” First published in 1946; now in a new translation by Matthew Ward.

THE MEURSAULT INVESTIGATION A tour-de-force reimagining of Camus s”The Stranger,” from the point of view of the mute Arab victims. ” The New Yorker” He was the brother of the Arab killed by the infamous Meursault, the antihero of Camus s classic novel. Seventy years after that event, Harun, who has lived since childhood in the shadow of his sibling s memory, refuses to let him remain anonymous: he gives his brother a story and a name Musa and describes the events that led to Musa s casual murder on a dazzlingly sunny beach. In a bar in Oran, night after night, he ruminates on his solitude, on his broken heart, on his anger with men desperate for a god, and on his disarray when faced with a country that has so disappointed him. A stranger among his own people, he wants to be granted, finally, the right to die. “The Stranger “is of course central to Daoud s story, in which he both endorses and criticizes one of the most famous novels in the world. A worthy complement to its great predecessor, “The Meursault Investigation “is not only a profound meditation on Arab identity and the disastrous effects of colonialism in Algeria, but also a stunning work of literature in its own right, told in a unique and affecting voice.”


Categories: Uncategorized



Categories: Uncategorized

Blog at